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Extending an Olive Branch

Hemant Mehta opens our solving weekend. The Daily Discussion looks at the puzzle puzzle for the first time since 1946. The answer to the puzzle is the word "Bushelers," a term used in slang to refer to a tailor's assistant who "bushels,” or fixes clothing and takes measurements. The clue hints at the individual works of Sir Francis Bacon and hints at his individual works. The question mark in “Bacon bits?” suggests that the clue is not referring to the granules of salty, tasty bacon or bacon substitute that are delicious on salads.

Extending an Olive Branch

Published : 2 weeks ago by Deb Amlen in Lifestyle

On the other hand, I knew the word BALLERS in the sense that it was clued: “Ones who live large, in slang.” I also noticed on XWord Info that it was in a Times crossword once, in 1946, and — I couldn’t help myself — I peeked at the original clue because I knew it wouldn’t have been the same as the one in Mr. Mehta’s puzzle. Indeed, it wasn’t. The clue was the mystifying term “Bushelers.” Not one to admit defeat even in the face of confusion, I looked for a definition of “bushelers.” The term refers to a tailor’s assistant, who “bushels,” or fixes clothing and takes measurements. Ergo, if you want to be a BALLER and live large, go into garment making.

18A. To “Get behind something, say” means to support it, but this clue is suggesting a more literal interpretation: If you get behind something, you may be trying to HIDE.

21A. I had “pecan” at first, because that is a “Tough nut to crack,” but that’s not where this clue was going at all. The tough nut in this puzzle is a POSER, a word with English origins that means a hard question.

35A. This is a very clever clue, and I love it to bits. The question mark in “Bacon bits?” tells us that the clue is not referring to the granules of salty, tasty bacon or bacon substitute that are delicious on salads. The clue hints at the individual works of Sir Francis Bacon, and one of these would be an ESSAY.

38A. You can dab cologne on your wrist or neck, but take a closer look at the clue. The word “Cologne” in “Cologne’s place” is capitalized for two reasons. It’s naturally capitalized as the first word in the sentence, and the word was placed there to hide the fact that it is a proper noun. It’s the city in Germany, and the RHINE runs through it.

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